More on Netprospex

I thought I would take a moment to follow-up on my recent post (Bad Advice in the B2B Space) covering Netprospex's suggestion that "opt-out" is good enough. It seems as though more and more folks have been expressing opinions on Netprospex's advice and even the company's business model. Here's what they had to say.

Ask Al: Additional Received Headers?

Jeremy writes, "Hey, Al! I was wondering if you could help me make a case for adding additional received headers to outbound messages. At the company I work for, one of our technologists convinced the head guy that we should try adding additional unique received headers to every message, rotating through unique IP addresses and host names. Do you have any insight on whether or not this would be a good or bad practice? Thanks in advance."

ClickZ: Goodmail CEO Steps Down

ClickZ reported on February 18th that "Peter Horan's two-year run as Goodmail's CEO came to an end on Feb. 12, though the Internet marketing veteran will stay on as chairman for the certified e-mail service provider. Speaking with ClickZ late Thursday afternoon, Horan confirmed an Internet rumor that he had stepped down." Read the rest here.

Bad Advice in the B2B Space

"B to B Online" shares some really awful advice from Gary Halliwell and Mark Feldman of NetProspex about how opt-out is supposedly the way to go in the B2B (business to business) email marketing realm. They start out by banging the CAN-SPAM drum (make sure you're compliant!! yawn) and then get side tracked into targeting and content.

Don't Spam the Judge

Kevin Trudeau, infomercial peddler of miracle cures (and who knows what else), narrowly avoided jail on Thursday after being cited for contempt over his recent attempt to incite friends and followers to harass the judge presiding over his trial.

SpamResource/XNND Co-Reg Dashboard

I've just completed my first-ever co-registration/lead generation signup tracking dashboard. You can find it at http://xnnd.com/cr/ and it will update daily. As time permits, I'll add additional information and detail to the dashboard.

Tagged.com Wins Spam Lawsuit

Laura Atkins hipped me to this report from SPAMFighter about Tagged.com winning a lawsuit against a spammer, somebody who was "victimizing members of Tagged.com by dispatching spam e-mails that contained web-links directing users to a dating site." Blah blah blah, spam is bad, etc. Enough about that.

Surprise! Internet filled with Junk

Websense reports that in the latter half of 2009:
  • 13.7 percent of searches for trending news/buzz words (as defined by Yahoo Buzz & Google Trends) lead to malware,
  • 95 percent of user-generated comments to blogs, chat rooms and message boards are spam or malicious,
  • 35 percent of malicious Web attacks included data-stealing code,
  • 58 percent of data-stealing attacks are conducted over the Web, and
  • 85.8 percent of all emails were spam.
Read more about it here.

WHOIS Privacy Protect -- What Spamfighters Think

As others have mentioned, a recent court ruling suggests that when accompanied with "intentional spamming," hiding who owns a domain behind a "privacy protect" service (such as Domains by Proxy) could mean that the sender is in violation of the CAN-SPAM law. But let's set that aside for a moment. Even if there wasn't a potential legal issue, do recipient systems and anti-spam groups find privacy protect to be a reputable practice? Let's ask a few smart anti-spam experts what they think.

What is this thing?

If you're viewing this on www.spamresource.com, or if you click through to the site from your RSS reader, you'll now notice a "Co-reg Mail Received" section just to the right of the post on the site. This highlights IP addresses that have recently sent mail to the mailboxes that I use to track mail sent by "co-registration" or "lead generation" senders. Companies in this space often buy "feeds" or "feed paths" from other companies, and there is much data sharing back and forth. I just wanted to start tracking who's actively sending mail to my accounts, and this was a quick and easy way to do it. Keep an eye out as I update this section with more information over time. Might be neat to see how many emails this mailbox has received, how many times an IP address has been seen, etc.

I'm not alleging that this mail is spam, and most of the mail I see seems to comply with US federal law. That's not to say that senders in this space don't engage in practices that can cause significant deliverability issues. If you and a thousand other senders are all mailing to the same email lists, it seems as though a "tragedy of the commons" effect could apply, wherein ISPs find none of the senders to be sending desirable, wanted mail.
 
As always, your feedback is welcome.

Word to the Wise Delivery Wiki

Laura Atkins just announced the Word to the Wise Delivery Wiki, a cool new deliverability resource. Very cool!

My Delicious links account isn't anywhere near as awesome as the WTTW Wiki, but it's still out there and it's something that I use every day. Looking for information about Comcast? Just add "comcast" to the URL. International ISP and legal links? Add the word "international." Etc.