How OnlineGroups.net used the Yahoo! DMARC crisis to make a better Mailing List Manager

Yahoo's recent DMARC policy change didn't just break somebody's church list. It also caused problems for every single discussion group hosted by OnlineGroups.net. Chief Wrangler Dan Randow and his team didn't take that sitting down. They didn't cry, shake their fists at the heavens, or order t-shirts that said "YAHOO BROKE MY MAILING LISTS AND ALL I GOT WAS THIS LOUSY T-SHIRT." Instead, they quickly came up with and executed a plan, implementing product changes within two days to make their collaboration platform compatible with Yahoo's DMARC domain policy. What did they do and how did they do it? Click on through to learn more about it.

Who uses a Yahoo from address?

In the next chapter in the story of Yahoo's recent DMARC policy change, Andrew Barrett shares a snapshot of what percentage of an example email service provider's clients send mail via the ESP using a Yahoo.com from address.

Run an email discussion list? Here's how to deal with DMARC

Yahoo's recent DMARC policy changes have made it so that Yahoo subscribers will now have trouble participating in old fashioned LISTSERV-style discussion lists. When a Yahoo user posts to your discussion list, very few subscribers will receive that message, because any ISP that respects DMARC policy will bounce that message. (And I believe that at least half of the top ten mailbox providers in the US now respect DMARC policy.)

Up in arms about Yahoo's DMARC Policy? You're not alone.

A few days ago, Yahoo updated their DMARC policy setting to "p=reject." What this means is, mail containing a Yahoo from address is basically no longer considered legitimate if it doesn't contain an authentication signature or if it didn't come from properly identified Yahoo infrastructure. (I'm oversimplifying things there, but bear with me; I think it's close enough for this discussion. Read more about it over at Word to the Wise.)

This effectively restricts Yahoo Mail users so that they can only send from their Yahoo email address when using the Yahoo Mail web user interface. For a big segment of regular joes, this may not ever be an issue. But for some people, this is a profoundly significant new restriction on what you can do with a Yahoo email address. Indeed, this change "brings the pain" for some, as Andrew Barrett explains over on the E-mail Skinny blog.

Payday Loans: Not Even Necessary

I have no problem helping a client address deliverability issues, even if their industry or politics encompass something I don't personally approve of.  My friend Mickey Chandler and I (who have very different political affiliations) have worked capably together to help address deliverability and compliance issues for various political senders on both sides of the US political spectrum.

But payday lending holds a special place in my (dark) heart.

Masking WHOIS Information: No Abuse.net for you

The WHOIS process and protocol isn't just some nerd thing that goes back a hundred years; it's a valuable public directory for savvy internet users to be able to identify who owns a given domain name. Spam and security investigators find it a valuable tool -- even if sometimes bad guys submit bogus details, commonality of information across domains allows them to paint a clearer picture of who is behind a bad act or how broad that bad act may be.