Ask Al: Is my personal domain affected by DMARC?

All this talk about Yahoo's recent DMARC policy change got a friend to ask me about her domain name and whether or not this change has any impact on her.

Ellen asked me, "Does this mean anyone with a personal domain sending through an ISP who implements DMARC with a p=reject policy is going to have problems if they try to send mail to any recipient who checks DMARC?"

Yahoo DMARC Policy: Why they did it.

How dare Yahoo update their DMARC policy without warning the internet community of the potential fallout from doing so. At least, that's what some other folks have said. My take on it is more prosaic. I figure it's your domain name, you're free to do whatever you want with it. Initially, Yahoo made no statement, leaving us interested folks with nothing but our own speculation about why they've implemented this policy change. (They did later post a limited DMARC Help page and then also a more detailed statement explaining the change.) Here's my speculation.

How OnlineGroups.net used the Yahoo! DMARC crisis to make a better Mailing List Manager

Yahoo's recent DMARC policy change didn't just break somebody's church list. It also caused problems for every single discussion group hosted by OnlineGroups.net. Chief Wrangler Dan Randow and his team didn't take that sitting down. They didn't cry, shake their fists at the heavens, or order t-shirts that said "YAHOO BROKE MY MAILING LISTS AND ALL I GOT WAS THIS LOUSY T-SHIRT." Instead, they quickly came up with and executed a plan, implementing product changes within two days to make their collaboration platform compatible with Yahoo's DMARC domain policy. What did they do and how did they do it? Click on through to learn more about it.

Who uses a Yahoo from address?

In the next chapter in the story of Yahoo's recent DMARC policy change, Andrew Barrett shares a snapshot of what percentage of an example email service provider's clients send mail via the ESP using a Yahoo.com from address.

Run an email discussion list? Here's how to deal with DMARC

Yahoo's recent DMARC policy changes have made it so that Yahoo subscribers will now have trouble participating in old fashioned LISTSERV-style discussion lists. When a Yahoo user posts to your discussion list, very few subscribers will receive that message, because any ISP that respects DMARC policy will bounce that message. (And I believe that at least half of the top ten mailbox providers in the US now respect DMARC policy.)