Orange UK Email Closure

United Kingdom-based ISP Orange (now part of Everything Everywhere aka EE) has announced that they are shutting down their email service as of May 31, 2017. This affects users at these domains: orange.net, orangehome.co.uk, wanadoo.co.uk, freeserve.co.uk, fsbusiness.co.uk, fslife.co.uk, fsmail.net, fsworld.co.uk, fsnet.co.uk. This does not affect non-UK Orange email users.

Follow this link for more details.

New DMARC Record Lookup Tool

If you use the DNS tools over on XNND, you might notice that the DMARC record lookup feature now links to a new DMARC record lookup tool, kindly provided by Steve Atkins of Word to the Wise. Thanks, Steve!

Senders: What should you do about verizon.net?

As mentioned in a previous post, Verizon recently announced that it is getting out of the email hosting business.

Verizon users are being given a choice. They can:
  • Give up their verizon.net email address; or
  • Continue to use their verizon.net email address, but it will now be hosted by AOL.
Note also that Verizon has yet to announce a deadline as to when users will have to make this choice.

What does this mean for senders? What should senders "do" about verizon.net subscribers?

Truth be told, senders really shouldn't have to do anything here. The email domain verizon.net is not going away. Current users are going to be able to keep their existing email addresses. It is just that going forward, those email addresses will be hosted by AOL.

If a user chooses to give up their verizon.net email address, mail to that address with eventually start bouncing. Any good list management software or ESP platform should be able to denote those bounces and suppress that email address, after it goes dormant. There really shouldn't be any negative impact to email deliverability.

Even if senders wanted to do something with this segment of subscribers -- there isn't much they could do. You could email all of your verizon.net subscribers today, but what would you tell them? You don't know which ones plan to keep their email address and which ones plan to move.

I think all senders really need to do here is:
  1. Keep your regular mailing cadence;
  2. Make sure you have an easy "update your email address" process as part of your email footer; and
  3. Make sure your email platform automatically recognizes and suppresses no-longer-valid email addresses.
Beyond that, really, no special action is needed.

ETA: There's certainly no harm if you want to send all verizon.net users an email message asking them if they want to update their email address. I think it all boils down to how much effort you want to put forth to try to save a percentage of a percentage of users. How big the value you'll get from that is really impossible to measure without doing it. That's why my guidance is to just let the email platform work it out for you.

Do you care about WHOIS?

There's an effort underway within ICANN where the net result could be that publicly-available domain ownership info is no longer available under any circumstances. Does that strike you as the best way to go? I personally don't think it is. WHOIS is a valuable forensic tool for security researchers and spam filterers.

Does a business have a right to privacy on the internet? I say no. If you're a company in the real world, your company registration is public knowledge. If you're a company on the internet, shouldn't that registration information be at least as available?

If WHOIS matters to you, please consider joining the "Next-Generation gTLD Registration Directory Services to Replace Whois" ICANN group and sharing your opinion, voting in the surveys they publish, and responding to the questions people may ask about why WHOIS matters.


Verizon Users: Leave, or move to AOL

As reported last May, the Verizon email user transition to AOL continues, with Verizon now announcing that they have decided to "close down our email business."

Existing verizon.net email users have two options:

  1. Continue to use their verizon.net email address, but it will be hosted by AOL Mail.
  2. Give up their verizon.net email address and find a new email/webmail provider.

From a deliverability perspective, I think it is safe to assume that most of the Verizon email infrastructure is being retired, and that the verizon.net email address domain lives on a just another of the AOL email domains (like cs.com, wmconnect.com, aim.com, wow.com, etc.) There likely won't be any difference in reputation or filtering systems between verizon.net and aol.com mailboxes, when the transition is fully complete. This could be subject to change, so stay tuned.

Update: Laura Atkins of Word to the Wise rightly points out that there's no timeline or deadline published anywhere in this Verizon notice. When exactly will Verizon shut it all down? We shall see.

June 26, 2017 Update: As related to me and others by AOL, the Verizon mailboxes that remain have now been transitioned to AOL's mail servers.