Google moves gmail.com to "quarantine" DMARC policy (for subdomains)

Gmail warned us that a more restrictive DMARC policy was coming, didn't they? That warning came all the way back in 2015. They said that "p=reject" was coming. Maybe it still is -- we're not there yet, but this appears to be a step in the right direction.

Today's update: For subdomains under gmail.com and googlemail.com, they've implemented a "quarantine" DMARC policy.

Still, this change has a significant impact on senders. If you send mail with from address of (something)@gmail.com or (something)@googlemail.com through an outside (non-Gmail) email platform like an ESP, that mail is likely to get delivered to the spam folder. I jumped the gun a bit on this one -- today, this doesn't affect your sending as (something)@gmail.com.

They're not the first to implement a DMARC "quarantine" policy for some part of their domain. Apple did the same thing back in July. Mail.ru went to "p=reject" back in March.  And of course OATH (AOL and Yahoo) started this trend, implementing a "p=reject" policy for their main domains way back in 2014.

Edit: Ha ha, fingers sometimes move faster than brain. To clarify, this applies to subdomains of gmail.com -- i.e. bounces.gmail.com, server.gmail.com, etc. The DMARC policy for the top level of gmail.com and googlemail.com is still p=none. My bad for suggesting otherwise.

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